Stanford Cancer Institute Directory

Profiles

Showing 21 - 30 of 458
    Associate Professor of Developmental Biology, of Computer Science and of Pediatrics (Genetics)

    Bio

    The Bejerano Lab studies genome function in human and related species. We are deeply interested in the following broad questions: Mapping genome sequence (variation) to phenotype (differences) and extracting specific genetic insights from deep sequencing measurements. We take a particular interest in gene cis regulation. We use our joint affiliation to apply a combination of computational and experimental approaches. We collect large scale experimental data; write computational analysis tools; run them massively to discover the most exciting testable hypotheses; which we proceed to experimentally validate. We work in small teams, in house or with close collaborators of experimentalists and computational tool users who interact directly with our computational tool builders. Please see our research tab for more.
    Assistant Professor (Research) of Pathology
    Laurie Kraus Lacob Professor

    Bio

    Laurie Kraus Lacob Professor Fellow, Stanford Distinguished Careers Institute Director, Stanford Women’s Cancer Center Senior Scientific Advisor, Stanford Cancer Institute Director, Stanford Health Care Communication Program
    Professor of Biology
    Alfred Woodley Salter and Mabel Smith Salter Endowed Professor in Pediatrics
    Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Radiology and of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Bio

    Professor Carolyn Bertozzi's research interests span the disciplines of chemistry and biology with an emphasis on studies of cell surface sugars important to human health and disease. Her research group profiles changes in cell surface glycosylation associated with cancer, inflammation and bacterial infection, and uses this information to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, most recently in the area of immuno-oncology. Dr. Bertozzi completed her undergraduate degree in Chemistry at Harvard University and her Ph.D. at UC Berkeley, focusing on the chemical synthesis of oligosaccharide analogs. During postdoctoral work at UC San Francisco, she studied the activity of endothelial oligosaccharides in promoting cell adhesion at sites of inflammation. She joined the UC Berkeley faculty in 1996. A Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator since 2000, she came to Stanford University in June 2015, among the first faculty to join the interdisciplinary institute ChEM-H (Chemistry, Engineering & Medicine for Human Health). Named a MacArthur Fellow in 1999, Dr. Bertozzi has received many awards for her dedication to chemistry, and to training a new generation of scientists fluent in both chemistry and biology. She has been elected to the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, and American Academy of Arts and Sciences; and received the Lemelson-MIT Prize, the Heinrich Wieland Prize, and the ACS Award in Pure Chemistry, among many others. Her efforts in undergraduate education have earned the UC Berkeley Distinguished Teaching Award and the Donald Sterling Noyce Prize for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. Today, the Bertozzi Group at Stanford studies the glycobiology underlying diseases such as cancer, inflammatory disorders such as arthritis, and infectious diseases such as tuberculosis. The work has advanced understanding of cell surface oligosaccharides involved in cell recognition and inter-cellular communication. Dr. Bertozzi's lab also develops new methods to perform controlled chemical reactions within living systems. The group has developed new tools for studying glycans in living systems, and more recently nanotechnologies for probing biological systems. Such "bioorthoganol" chemistries enable manipulation of biomolecules in their living environment. Several of the technologies developed in the Bertozzi lab have been adapted for commercial use. Actively engaged with several biotechnology start-ups, Dr. Bertozzi founded Redwood Bioscience of Emeryville, California, and has served on the research advisory board of GlaxoSmithKline.
    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Hematology) and of Genetics

    Bio

    In perpetual awe of how 'simple' microbial organisms can perturb complex, multicellular eukaryotic organisms, Ami Bhatt has chosen to dedicate her research program to inspecting, characterizing and dissecting the microbe-human interface. Nowhere is the interaction between hosts and microbes more potentially impactful than in immunocompromised hosts and global settings where infectious and environmental exposures result in drastic and sometimes fatal health consequences. Ami's group identifies problems and questions that arise in the course of routine clinical care. Often in collaboration with excellent investigators at Stanford and beyond, the group applies modern genetic, molecular and computational techniques to seek answers to these questions, better understand host-microbe interactions and decipher how perturbation of these interactions may result in human disease phenotypes.
    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Stanford Cancer Center
    Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics
    The Donald E. and Delia B. Baxter Foundation Professor and Director, Baxter Laboratory for Stem Cell Biology

    Bio

    Assistant Professor, Stanford University, 1978 Associate Professor, Stanford University, 1986 Professor, Stanford University, 1991

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