F@200 GRANT RECIPIENTS

Congratulations to the following Stanford faculty, fellows, and students who have been awarded grants from Stanford Medicine and the Muse Program’s Frankenstein@200 initiative. The initiative, timed to honor the 200th anniversary of the publication of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, is designed to stimulate discourse and reflection, and will include courses, films, performances, book discussions, colloquia, and special exhibits. In spring 2018, the initiative will culminate with the Frankenstein@200 International Health Humanities Conference, featuring Rebecca Skloot, author of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks in a preconference event and Dr. Alexander Nemerov, chair of Stanford’s Department of Art & Art History as a keynote speaker. For more information, visit Frankenstein@200. Special thanks to medical student Ryan Brewster for designing the Frankenstein@200 logo.

Haodong Chen, PhD, and and Joseph Wu, MD, PhD

Haodong Chen, PhD

Joseph Wu, MD, PhD

Haodong Chen, PhD, Post doctoral fellow, Cardiovascular Institute and Joseph Wu, MD, PhD Director of Stanford Cardiovascular Institute & Professor of Medicine and Radiology

Frankenstein in a Test Tube Using iPSC: to study the effects of cross-sex hormones on human heart muscle cells using human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs).

Shane Denson, PhD

Shane Denson, PhD

Shane Denson, PhD, Assistant Professor, Art & Art History

Videographic Frankenstein: to engage students in the emerging field of videographic scholarship: producing a set of video essays on Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and its many cinematic adaptations.

Douglas Eacho, PhD student, and Branislav Jakovljevic, PhD

Douglas Eacho, PhD student

Branislav Jakovljevic, PhD

Douglas Eacho, PhD student, Theater & Performance Studies and Branislav Jakovljevic, PhD, Chair, Department of Theater and Performing Arts

Revisiting Radiohole’s ‘Inflatable Frankenstein:  to bring the three theater artists known as Radiohole to Stanford to screen and discuss their celebrated Frankenstein adaptation, and lead a workshop for students around the text and their methods.   

Karola Kreitmair, PhD, and David Magnus, PhD

Karola Kreitmair, PhD

David Magnus, PhD

Karola Kreitmair, PhD, Clinical Ethics Fellow at the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics and  David Magnus, PhD, Director, Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics

Homo Ex Machina: the creation and production of a play to explore the demands of scientific progress on the existential process of being human. (This project is also supported by the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Chair's Initiative in Medical Humanities)

Nick Love, PhD, MS2, and Sam Rodriguez, MD

Nick Love, PhD, MS2

Sam Rodriguez, MD

Nick Love, PhD, MS2, and Sam Rodriguez, MD, Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

Reflecting Frankenstein: A visual arts piece combining Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein with mirror, shape, color, and metallurgy to create a life-sized, humanoid-shaped, physically reflective work of art using laser-cut mirror and acrylic panels inscribed with text from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. (This project is also supported by the Drs. Ben and A. Jess Shenson Funds)

Charlotte Thun-Hohenstein, PhD student, and Paula Findlen, PhD

Charlotte Thun-Hohenstein, PhD student

Paula Findlen, PhD

Charlotte Thun-Hohenstein, PhD student, Department of History (with collaborators from Depts. TAPS and Electrical Engineering) and Paula Findlen, PhD, Chair, Department of History

GRID: a laser project to provoke reflection about the relationship of science and nature, and the ethical boundaries between the two. The installation will innovate collaboration between artistic and technological communities, and function as a space for contemplation, socialization, and interdisciplinary dialogue. Curated projection evenings will be designed as both social and artistic events, and include dates important in the life of Mary Shelley. (This project is also supported by the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Chair's Initiative in Medical Humanities)

Meagan Wu, undergraduate ‘18, and Sam Rodriguez, MD

Sam Rodriguez, MD

Meagan Wu, undergraduate ‘18, and Sam Rodriguez, MD, Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

Breaching the Boundary between Life and Death: a fine arts project to examine what it means to be human. It will also reflect on the fascination with the human body as a work of art - to be studied, appreciated, and recreated. (This project is also supported by the Drs. Ben and A. Jess Shenson Funds)

2017-18 Grant Recipients