Topic List : Neuroscience

  • Major gifts to neurosciences institute

    In recognition of a gift from alumna Clara Wu Tsai and her husband, Joe Tsai, the Stanford Neurosciences Institute is changing its name to the Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute.


  • Concussion study in high school football

    Three Bay Area high school football teams have been outfitted with mouthguards that measure head motion. Stanford scientists hope to use the data to better understand what causes concussions.


  • What to know about concussions

    Angela Lumba-Brown, MD, co-director of the Stanford Concussion and Brain Performance Center, is the lead author of the newly published CDC Guidelines on the Management of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Children. In a recent interview, she explained what families should know about concussions.


  • Repeated DNA arrays can confer psychiatric risks

    Repeated, human-specific DNA sequences are tied to an increased risk of psychiatric disorders, a Stanford study finds. It might be possible to treat the diseases with existing drugs.


  • Brain circuit tied to sociability

    Autism spectrum disorder is marked by severe social deficits. Stanford researchers were able to reverse those types of deficits in mice by activating a single brain circuit.


  • New therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy

    The FDA has approved the use of an implanted device that releases periodic electrical discharges in the brain to counteract seizures in people with epilepsy. In an interview, neurologist Robert Fisher described the technology and Stanford’s role in testing the device.


  • Impaired reward circuitry in autism

    Deficits in the brain’s reward circuit are linked to social deficits in children with autism and may point the way toward better treatments, according to a new Stanford study.


  • Nicotine-mimicking molecules as medicine?

    Stanford researchers discovered that a receptor that binds to nicotine and to clusters of beta-amyloid molecules is found on certain types of immune cells that can act as suppressors and regulators of the immune system.


  • Low hormone level may be autism marker

    In the fluid around the brain, low levels of a hormone called vasopressin are linked to low social ability in monkeys and to autism in children, Stanford scientists have found.


  • Fear, courage switches found in brain

    Pinpoint stimulation of a cluster of nerve cells in the brains of mice encouraged timid responses to a perceived threat, whereas stimulation of an adjacent cluster induced boldness and courage.