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In the News

May

 

Global News Canada, 05/28/2020

-- Did Polly see a murder? Parrot to provide evidence in Argentina trial

A brutal murder case in Argentina may hinge on the recall powers of one feather-brained witness: the victim's parrot. The parrot may be able to recall a key piece of evidence in the case after a police officer at the crime scene overheard it mimicking a cry for help. Laurel Braitman, Writer-in-Residence, provides comment.

 

Stanford Scope Blog, 05/28/2020

-- Busting myths about urinary tract infections | Understanding UTIs, Part 3

As with much health information, the internet can lead patients down a rabbit hole when it comes to UTIs. Here are seven common myths -- and the truth, or lack of evidence, behind them. Joanna Langner, graduate student of Community Health and Prevention Research, wrote this series with the support of Randall Stafford, Professor of Medicine.

 

STAT News, 05/27/2020

-- Experts decry FDA's halting of a high-profile COVID-19 study over approvals

FDA regulators halted a high-profile effort to study the spread of coronavirus in the Seattle area, called Seattle Coronavirus Assessment Network (SCAN). Outside experts said the abrupt move was unnecessary and that researchers should have been asked to re-apply. Hank Greely, Profess of Law and Director of the Stanford Center for Law and the Biosciences provides comment.

 

Palo Alto Daily Post, 05/25/2020

-- Rest home where 13 died from coronavirus passed all inspections

State inspections as recently as January give no clue why 13 patients, including former Stanford President Donald Kennedy, would die from the coronavirus at the Gordon Manor assisted living home in Redwood City. Dr. VJ Periyakoil, Associate Professor of Medicine, said that there are three reasons why outbreaks such as the one that’s hit Gordon Manor have been so devastating.

 

Stanford Scope, 5/21/20

-- How to prevent a urinary tract infection | Understanding UTIs, Part 2

The second installment in the Understanding UTIs series provides information about preventing urinary tract infections, including risk factors and how to avoid them. This piece is written by Joanna Langner, a graduate student in Community Health and Prevention Research at Stanford. She wrote this series with the support of Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, and Kim Chiang, clinical assistant professor of medicine.

 

The Stanford Daily, 5/20/20

-- Writing Medicine workshop helps healthcare workers reflect on pandemic

Writing Medicine, a weekly workshop led by bestselling author and Director of Writing and Storytelling at Stanford’s Medicine and the Muse Program, gathers hundreds of healthcare individuals to explore creative writing and share their stories during the ongoing pandemic. Laurel Braitman, Writer in Residence, is featured.

 

The New York Times, 5/19/20

-- Opinion: How Will Cities Survive the Coronavirus?

They could take a long time to recover -- and may look very different when they do. Steven Goodman, Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health, provides comment.

 

Stanford Scope Blog, 5/14/20

-- What is a urinary tract infection? | Understanding UTIs, Part 1

This is the first part in Understanding UTIs, an accessible series about urinary tract infections, including their symptoms, causes, medications and more. This piece is written by Joanna Langner, a graduate student in Community Health and Prevention Research at Stanford. She wrote this series with the support of Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, and Kim Chiang, clinical assistant professor of medicine.

 

KCBS News, 05/13/20

--The Medical Ethics of Using Telemedicine

The Coronavirus pandemic has forced many doctors and their patients to rely on telemedicine to conduct office visits by a computer screen. Patients fear contracting the virus if they enter a doctor's office and prefer the safety of their home screen to entering an office. But what about the doctor/patient privacy that could be compromised? For more KCBS news anchors Jeff Bell and Patti Reising spoke with David Magnus, the Thomas A. Raffin Professor of Medicine and Biomedical Ethics, Director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics.

 

Stanford Engineering, 05/11/20

--Megan Palmer: COVID-19’s scientific silver lining

On the Future of Everything podcast, Russ Altman, the Kenneth Fong Professor of Bioengineering, Genetics, Medicine, Biomedical Data Science and (by courtesy) Computer Science, and Megan Palmer, the executive director of Stanford's Bio Policy and Leadership Initiatives, discuss and offer insight on today’s COVID-19 crisis and hope that leaders in policy, science and security can unite to prevent the next pandemic.

 

The Los Angeles Times, 5/12/20

--Column: Amid race for COVID cure, medical files ‘are not as confidential as we think’

How will researchers recruit subjects for COVID-19 vaccine or cure tests? It seems fair to wonder how confidential our medical records are. Mildred Cho, Professor of Pediatrics, Medicine and Associate Director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, provides comment.

 

The Wall Street Journal, 5/11/20

--One Idea for Speeding a Coronavirus Vaccine: Deliberately Infecting People

It’s a controversial idea: Intentionally infect people with the virus that causes Covid-19 to test the effectiveness of a potential vaccine. The approach is called a human challenge trial, and it’s not the usual way a vaccine is tested. David Magnus, the Thomas A. Raffin Professor of Medicine and Biomedical Ethics, Director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, provides comment.

 

The New York Times, 05/11/20

--Employers rush to adopt virus screening. The tools may not help much.

Symptom-checking apps and fever-screening cameras promise to keep sick workers at home and hinder the virus. But experts warn they can be inaccurate and violate privacy. Hank Greely, the Deane F. and Kate Edelman Johnson Professor of Law, provides comment.

 

NBC News, 05/10/2020

--Why have 14,000 people volunteered to be infected with coronavirus?

They want to take part in a "human challenge trial," an ethically controversial vaccine test that infects people with a virus that doesn't yet have a cure. David Magnus, the Thomas A. Raffin Professor in Medicine and Biomedical Ethics, director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, provides comment.

 

USA Today, 05/05/20

--To find a coronavirus vaccine, can we ethically infect people with a disease with no cure?

To have a vaccine by next summer will require both luck and cutting corners never cut before, putting once seemingly academic questions about vaccine testing suddenly front and center. David Magnus, the Thomas A. Raffin Professor in Medicine and Biomedical Ethics, director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, provides comment.

 

Stanford Medicine, 05/04/20

--Heartened by employees’ COVID-19 test results, Stanford Health Care resumes almost all procedures

With extensive testing showing very low COVID-19 infection rates and with many safety measures in place, Stanford Health Care providers are now performing almost all medical procedures, including surgeries, diagnostic imaging and routine screenings. Norman Rizk, the Berthold and Belle N. Guggenhime Professor and chief medical officer for Stanford Health Care, provides comment.

 

SCOPE, 05/04/20

--Palliative care training project helps improve, expand services in India

A Stanford-led palliative-care training program is helping critically and chronically ill patients in India get services they need. Karl Lorenz, professor of medicine; Jake Mickelsen, principal improvement consultant at Stanford Medicine; and Stephanie Harman, clinical associate professor of medicine, are mentioned in this post.

 

Los Angeles Times, 05/01/20

--The pandemic has amplified ageism. ‘It’s open season for discrimination' against older adults

On the good days, Bonnie Reed believes that, for the first time in a long time, just about everyone is united in a common cause: to protect society’s most vulnerable citizens against the coronavirus. On the bad days, the Sherman Oaks senior is stunned by the carelessness she sees around her. David Magnus is quoted.

 

Read More in SCBE News

Advanced Health Care Directive

California law give you the ability to ensure that your health care wishes are known and considered if you become unable to make these decisions yourself. Completing a form called an “Advance Health Care Directive” allows you to do a number of things:

Appoint another person to be your health care “agent”

Delineate your health care wishes, such as:

  • Health care instructions, including life support, organ and tissue donation
  • Revoke prior directives

A sample form is attached for reference. Acknowledgment before a notary public is not required if two qualified witnesses have signed this Directive in Part 5. In other words this is a free legally binding document.

Upcoming Events

Biomedical Ethics Speaker Semiar

Thursday, May 28, 11am
Jonathan Bowes

Associate Scientist, Research Policy 23andMe
Topic: Data Privacy at 23andMe
*via Zoom*

For Medicine & the Muse Program Events: CLICK HERE!

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