News Feature

  • Head, neck position affects concussion risk

    The way the head and neck are positioned during a head-on impact may significantly affect the risk of concussion, but tensed up neck muscles seem to offer far less protection, Stanford researchers found.


  • State of Stanford Medicine in 2018

    At this year’s State of Stanford Medicine event, the dean, hospital CEOs and a special guest shared their reflections on the strengths and challenges of the medical center today.


  • ‘Discovery Curriculum’ launched

    A redesigned curriculum for Stanford medical students is now being fully implemented. It provides new courses, more flexibility and financial incentives for pursuing long-term research.


  • Technique for quickly spotting TB

    A newly created two-piece fluorescent probe gets activated when it comes in contact with tuberculosis bacteria in a phlegm.


  • Busting myths about milk

    Milk is a good source of calcium but isn’t necessarily the most critical factor for bone health, according to a Stanford researcher who recently discussed the facts and “facts” about milk.


  • Computers help diagnose rare diseases

    A Stanford method for comparing patients’ symptoms and gene data to the medical literature could greatly speed the diagnosis of rare genetic diseases.


  • Mystery of headaches, nausea

    By the time she was 24, Rachel Hale was on her fourth diagnosis and had been on headache medication for years. Then she met with Ian Carroll, MD, a headache and orofacial pain specialist at Stanford.


  • New target for antibiotics

    Boosting efforts to fight antibiotic resistance, Stanford researchers have found that a thin membrane, thought to be just a shrink wrap around some bacterial cell walls, has structural properties critical for survival.


  • Repeated DNA arrays can confer psychiatric risks

    Repeated, human-specific DNA sequences are tied to an increased risk of psychiatric disorders, a Stanford study finds. It might be possible to treat the diseases with existing drugs.


  • How Biodesign technologies help patients

    Stanford Biodesign trainees have developed new medical devices and diagnostics that have been used to help care for more than 1.5 million patients so far.



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