Press Releases

  • Using ultrasound to release drug

    Stanford researchers used focused ultrasound to pry molecules of an anesthetic loose from nanoparticles. The drug’s release modified activity in brain regions targeted by the ultrasound beam.


  • DNA folding key to cell differentiation

    In trying to decipher the “DNA origami” responsible for the generation of transplantable human skin, Stanford researchers have uncovered a master regulatory hierarchy controlling tissue differentiation.


  • Gun laws and child gun deaths

    States with strict gun laws have lower rates of gun deaths among children and teenagers, and laws to keep guns away from minors are linked with fewer gun suicides in this age group, a Stanford study found.


  • Dean’s Medals awarded

    Three individuals will be awarded the Dean’s Medal for their contributions to the mission of Stanford Medicine.


  • Stanford, Apple describe heart-rhythm study

    Over 400,000 people have enrolled in a study being conducted by researchers at Stanford and Apple to determine whether a wearable technology can identify irregular heart rhythms suggestive of atrial fibrillation.


  • Older dads linked to higher birth risks

    From the data of more than 40 million births, scientists at Stanford have linked paternal age to birth risks, and even risks to the mother’s health.


  • Study: Anti-CD47 cancer therapy safe

    An immunotherapy conceived at Stanford appeared safe in an early clinical trial. Half of the participants responded positively to the treatment, aimed at triggering macrophages to engulf cancer cells, the researchers reported.


  • Genetics of rapid antler growth

    Stanford scientists and their collaborators have identified two key genes responsible for the rapid growth of deer antlers. They hope their insights will open the door to new approaches for treating bone diseases and fractures.


  • Clue charting cancer gene regulation

    Understanding when and where proteins bind to DNA may be the ticket to identifying cancer at the cellular level, according to researchers at Stanford.


  • Adult stem cells channel early development

    New research from Stanford shows that skeletal stem cells in mice assume a more primitive developmental state in response to extensive regeneration needs and environmental cues.



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