Neuroscience

  • Stanford scientists found more than 1,000 gene-activation differences between female and male mice’s brains, plus more than 600 between females in different stages of their reproductive cycle.

  • New possible ALS genes discovered

    Using machine learning, Stanford Medicine scientists and their colleagues have found hundreds of genes that could play a role in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  • Transfusion boosts brain function

    In a Stanford study, sedentary mice appear to benefit from another same-aged mouse’s exercise — if they receive injections of its blood.

  • Helping autistic job seekers

    Psychiatrist Lawrence Fung expanded his autism research into developing a program that helps those on the spectrum find jobs.

  • Study: New depression treatment effective

    In a double-blind controlled study, high doses of magnetic brain stimulation, given on an accelerated timeline and individually targeted, caused remission in 79% of trial participants with severe depression.

  • Stanford Medicine magazine explores the brain and nervous system

    The new issue of Stanford Medicine magazine features articles about developments in neuroscience and treatments for conditions affecting the brain and nervous system.

  • Michelle Monje awarded 'genius grant'

    The neuroscientist and pediatric neuro-oncologist is being recognized for her work to understand healthy brain development and create therapies for a group of lethal brain tumors.

  • Stroke center fills critical care need

    Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare's stroke program is recognized for its commitment to meeting rigorous national standards of stroke care.

  • Karl Deisseroth wins Lasker award

    Discoveries by Deisseroth and his two co-recipients regarding microbial light-activated molecules led to his development of a way to manipulate selected neurons in living animals to observe changes in their behavior.

  • Insulin resistance increases depression risk

    About 1 in 3 American adults has insulin resistance, a silent time bomb that doubles their risk for serious depression, Stanford scientists have learned.

  • With gift, Alzheimer’s center renamed

    In addition to supporting the nationally recognized research center, the Good Planet Foundation has endowed a professorship in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences.

  • Once-nightly narcolepsy drug is effective

    A phase 3 study has found that an extended-release version of sodium oxybate reduces daytime sleepiness and attacks of muscle weakness in narcolepsy patients.


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