Pediatrics

  • Children with obesity in a six-month healthy eating and exercise program experienced increases in their average telomere length, suggesting reversal of premature aging, a study led by Stanford Medicine researchers found.

  • Smartwatches diagnose kids’ arrhythmias

    Apple watches have some advantages over traditional ways of diagnosing cardiac arrhythmias in children but need more validation, finds a Stanford Medicine study.

  • Alvin Hackel dies at 91

    The Stanford Medicine professor emeritus of anesthesiology and of pediatrics invented a transport incubator for newborns and helped establish pediatric anesthesiology as a specialty.

  • Cancer neuroscience discoveries give hope

    To drive their growth, many tumors hijack nervous system signals, including those needed for brain plasticity. Stanford Medicine discoveries are opening a promising new branch of oncology research.

  • Diet choices can lower carbon footprint

    Stanford Medicine researchers and their colleagues have identified simple food swaps that, if adopted universally, could reduce the nation’s food-related carbon footprint by more than a third. The changes are also more healthy.

  • Why young kids don’t get severe COVID

    Children’s noses pack a punch that could help explain COVID-19’s typically mild course in young kids. Researchers hope to parlay that ‘nasal magic’ into increased protections for adults.

  • Less sleep, activity linked to prematurity

    Data from wearables show that deviations from normal sleep and activity in pregnancy are connected to a risk for premature delivery, a Stanford Medicine-led study found.

  • Memory in general hindered in autism

    Memory impairment in autism goes beyond poor facial recognition, a Stanford Medicine team showed. The finding suggests a wide role for memory in the neurobiology of the disorder.

  • Reversing a cystic fibrosis complication before birth

    Giving a new cystic fibrosis medication to a pregnant woman who carries the gene for the disease was unexpectedly beneficial for her fetus, a Stanford Medicine team found.

  • New pediatric emergency department opens

    The Marc and Laura Andreessen Pediatric Emergency Department at Stanford Medicine opened in 2022. This child-centered space puts young ones at ease while advanced care is delivered.

  • Distracting videos ease kids’ radiotherapy

    Most children receiving radiation therapy for cancer can hold still without anesthesia if they watch videos during the treatment, a study of a technique developed at Stanford Medicine found.

  • Hemorrhage toolkit is cost-effective

    A statewide quality-improvement project to treat excessive bleeding during childbirth averts $9 million annually in California’s health care costs, a Stanford Medicine-led study found.


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