Pediatrics

  • Two anti-cancer antibodies have a much stronger effect against pediatric nerve-cell and bone cancers in mice than either one alone, researchers have discovered.

  • Hormone treatment for transgender teens

    Transgender adults who started gender-affirming hormone therapy as teens had better mental health than those who waited until adulthood or wanted the treatment but never received it, a Stanford-led study found.

  • 500th heart transplant at Stanford

    Mackenzie Collins was the 500th pediatric patient to undergo a heart transplant at Stanford Medicine.

  • Piecemeal e-cigarette policies bad for youth

    Flavored disposable e-cigarettes attractive to young users proliferated after the most recent round of FDA policy announcements, negating the policies’ intended effects, a Stanford study found.

  • COVID-19 vaccines for 5- to 11-year-olds

    Answers to frequently asked questions as COVID-19 vaccinations roll out for children as young as 5.

  • Office of Child Health Equity launched

    Pediatrician Lisa Chamberlain will lead a new office that promotes pediatric health equity via research, community engagement and health policy.

  • When can you vaccinate your kids?

    Stanford pediatricians helped conduct clinical trials of COVID-19 vaccines for children. Data from the study will be submitted to the Food and Drug Administration for consideration.

  • Parents want to know cost of kids’ hospitalizations

    Most parents with children in the hospital want to learn what the stay will cost, but few are having conversations about money with hospital representatives, according to a study led by Stanford Medicine researchers.

  • Tips for kids’ back-to-school anxiety

    Returning to school as the pandemic stretches on may spark anxiety in young students, but there are approaches parents can use to build children’s resilience.

  • Wildfires and school ventilation

    With the COVID-19 pandemic and the growth of wildfires, California schools need to improve their air quality, according to Stanford pediatrician Lisa Patel. Fortunately, the funds are available.

  • Mindfulness training improves kids’ sleep

    Children who learned techniques such as deep breathing and yoga slept longer and better, even though the curriculum didn’t instruct them in improving sleep, a Stanford study has found.

  • Cost of gun injuries to minors

    The average cost of initial hospitalization to treat pediatric gun injuries is about $13,000 per patient and has risen in recent decades, a Stanford Medicine study found.


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